How to Separate Hoarded Items from Junk?

How to Separate Hoarded Items from Junk?

It certainly is time for a thorough spring clean, isn’t it? Organize your home and find what you have as well as what you don’t need. Call a junk removal to collect all the junk you’re throwing out!

What is Hoarding in short?

Everyone has probably seen the horrors of real hoarders on TV with their endless piles of junk they’ve collected and couldn’t let go of. While hoarding only occurs in 6 % of the entire population, it can actually run in the family and affect anyone. For example, they never did away with the majority of their various items, or if they were proper hoarders, chances are, you may develop hoarding tendencies as well. However, it can be a good thing and a bad thing at the same time.

Hoarding garbage, moldy food, teabags, magazines, food cans, and alike certainly isn’t a positive variation of hoarding. Indeed, it can be an extreme health hazard. Such items are junk, which has absolutely no value. Hoarders tend to keep all sorts of things as they feel they may need it at some point, even if it was 20 hammers and 50 lamps. The truth is, you’ll never need used tea bags again. No one usually decides to grab one of the old magazines from twenty years ago to read it. If you look around in your home and find a hoarded collection of certain items or your clothes begin to fall onto you as soon you open the door to your closet, you may feel anxious to become a hoarder. You don’t have to.

How to Differentiate Hoarding Items from Essentials?

Especially the older generations who’ve been through wars have the urge to hoard certain items. In fact, in times of high uncertainty, like during an economic crisis or a pandemic, it’s rather wise to stock up on some extra food and daily necessities. Dry foods and soap, as well as toilet paper, never runoff, and we’ve seen at the beginning of the corona pandemic how quickly a product of daily use, such as toilet paper, can suddenly become a rarity. However, that doesn’t automatically mean you should turn your garage into private toilet paper storage. Having an extra pack or two is fine. If you have space for five additional loads, it’s still ok. But a hundred would be over the top, and you lose space for other items you may need in times of a disaster.

That being said, hoarding a selected range of items that would come in handy, such as food, is not a bad thing at all. You only need to take care of not hoarding too much junk. Check the expiry days regularly to ensure you’re not accidentally something that’s passed its use.

Do you keep a lot of medicine?

Older people often have a huge variety of medications in their homes, and they forget to check if any of them has run out. The chances are that you have a wild array of meds hoarded, which you don’t need, or that’s passed expiration. Any meds that have expired are nothing but junk. Indeed, they could even pose a health hazard if you were accidentally taking some of it without looking at the expiry date. Most medications are only safe to use for a certain amount of time before their desired effect may change and cause you some serious trouble with an emergency visit at the ER.

Have a look at your medications and sort out any that have a runoff. Dispose of them at your local pharmacy or at your junk removal before they could turn into a health hazard for playing children and stray animals.

Let Go of Some Multimedia Kings

As a study found out a few years ago, most people hoard DVDs and even VHS cassettes. Do you watch all those movies and TV series or documentaries? Do they take up a lot of space in your home? Declutter your movie selection!

VHS cassettes obviously are nothing but junk and even bulky to store. They deteriorate within a few years, and whatever you’ve recorded is going to be hard to watch again – should you still have a functional VHS player. What about engaging someone who’d transfer family videos to a DVD or also as a digital file to keep on the hard drive? Look how much space you’ve made! You probably have a lot of those VHS movies on DVD anyway, do you?

It’s not necessarily wrong to have some DVDs you can watch if the internet has a blackout. We all love to collect our favorite movies and series, but 1000s of them? There’s no doubt you have a lot of junk among the DVDs as well. Go through all your DVDs and determine which ones are the absolute favorites you’d keep and watch over and over again. Create a pile of DVDs you’re not sure about whether to keep or not. After you’ve picked out your favorites, choose two DVDs from the ‘I’m not sure’ pile that are of a similar genre or theme. Subsequently, select the two you prefer the most. The other one goes to the junkyard. You can apply the same strategy to clothes. Worn-out clothes are actual junk, while you can organize the hoarded T-shirts and even shoes of which you only keep those you regularly wear.

Keep Up to Date Kitchen Stuff

Do you tend to hoard plastic boxes to store food? Technically, it’s great to have a good selection of plastic containers at hand. But what about those who miss their lid? Or the lids without their box? You may want to keep either as they may one day fit with another box, but that day never comes. Those would be junk with no use or value, taking up nothing but precious space and making it more and more frustrating to find a suitable box next time you need one. Do you need 20 spatulas? No. Two will be sufficient; the others are junk. And what about that juicer you haven’t used in years? As you don’t use it, it’s junk, but if it still works, you’re certainly going to find someone who’d be delighted to have yours.

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